Bright bike headlight “flattens” its light output to reduce glare

Bicycle headlights are now so bright that they can dazzle motorists, potentially (and ironically) causing those drivers to run into the cyclists who are using them. The Farina, however, is made to be bright without being blinding – plus it has some other nifty features. Designed by Korean startup Hauteworks, […]

Bicycle headlights are now so bright that they can dazzle motorists, potentially (and ironically) causing those drivers to run into the cyclists who are using them. The Farina, however, is made to be bright without being blinding – plus it has some other nifty features.

Designed by Korean startup Hauteworks, the aluminum-bodied, water-resistant Farina features two LEDs which sit one above the other. On top is a 1,100-lumen LED that projects a focused beam far down the road, while below is a 160-lumen LED that casts a wider, softer beam to illuminate the cyclist’s immediate surroundings – the latter also helps make the cyclist more visible to other road users.

The reflectors for both LEDs are designed in such a way that their combined cone of light is actually flat(ish) on top – that flat top is called the “cut-off line.” When first setting the headlight up on their handlebars, riders utilize an accompanying iOS/Android app that guides them in adjusting its angle, in order to keep the cut-off line below the line of sight of oncoming motorists.

That app can also be used to adjust settings such as the level of light output, or to switch between steady and flashing modes.

Hauteworks claims that the Farina weighs 149 grams
Hauteworks claims that the Farina weighs 149 grams

Hauteworks

The headlight additionally incorporates an ambient light sensor, which automatically turns the LEDs on in dark conditions. It also has a built-in accelerometer, that causes it to temporarily brighten when the rider hits the brakes – usually, such a brake light feature is only seen in tail lights.

Finally, if a thief tries to mess with the bike while it’s left untended, the Farina’s accelerometer detects the movement. Utilizing its Bluetooth module, the headlight will then contact the user’s smartphone and provide them with an alert.

One 3.5-hour USB charge of the integrated Samsung 21700 lithium battery should reportedly be good for 1.5 hours of runtime at a steady output of 1,100 lumens, ranging up to 26 hours of runtime if the light is set to night-time flashing mode.

The Farina is presently on Indiegogo, where a pledge of US$70 will get you one – assuming it reaches production. Its planned retail price is $100.

Source: Indiegogo

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