How to rebound from a job application rejection |

Yes, rejection hurts. But spending long periods agonizing over it is counterproductive. If you’re unemployed, the bottom line is you still don’t have a job; and if you’re employed, you still don’t have the job you want. Take a minute to vent to a close friend or a family member. […]

Yes, rejection hurts. But spending long periods agonizing over it is counterproductive. If you’re unemployed, the bottom line is you still don’t have a job; and if you’re employed, you still don’t have the job you want.

Take a minute to vent to a close friend or a family member. Candidly share your disappointment that you were not accepted for the specific position. Or if it’s more useful for you to express these feelings in other ways, like journaling or painting, do so.

Then do something completely disconnected from job hunting. Don’t think about this job, or any job, to avoid letting negative thoughts about the entire job search process overwhelm you. Instead, be completely present, whether you’re exercising, or assembling furniture, or cooking a large meal.

When you return to the job search process, take time to reflect on what you did right and what you might have improved during this last application process. Write both down on a sheet of paper. Then, write down tangible ways you can fix the things that require improvement. By performing this kind of self-assessment, you can use your rejection as an opportunity to grow and become an even more competitive applicant.

Begin or continue applying for the next desired opening. Use affirmations and mantras to keep you motivated and beat back pessimism. Share your job search progress with those friends and family most likely to provide you with the encouragement you need. And keep applying. With high levels of unemployment, sometimes, landing a gig does come down to a numbers game. But you’ll get the job you want if you keep working at it.

Next Post

Eli Roth's History of Horror Season 2 Reveals Killer Line-Up of Guests

Class is back in session starting Saturday, October 1o, at 10 pm ET/9 pm CT- and trust us: if you’re late, detention could prove pretty horrifying. On Monday, AMC announced the return of Eli Roth’s History of Horror for next month, along with the season’s official poster as well as a […]