‘I’m just completely fed up’: Phoenix woman says call police if you receive an unsolicited graphic photo

Cristopher Centers

“This story is a great opportunity to let people know there is something you can do,” said Sgt. Ann Justus of the Phoenix Police Department. PHOENIX — Getting unsolicited explicit photos online is a disgusting phenomenon that a shocking number of women have suffered.  Now, a Phoenix woman is fed […]

“This story is a great opportunity to let people know there is something you can do,” said Sgt. Ann Justus of the Phoenix Police Department.

PHOENIX — Getting unsolicited explicit photos online is a disgusting phenomenon that a shocking number of women have suffered. 

Now, a Phoenix woman is fed up about it and wants to let others know there is something to be done can do about it.

“It’s so violating and it’s offensive,” said Bella of north Phoenix. “I’m just completely fed up with it happening over and over again.”

Earlier this week, Bella, who asked 12 News not to use her last name, opened up Facebook to find a bizarre message from a complete stranger.

“He offered me money to move in with him, be his girlfriend,” Bella said, describing the message.

Bella told him no. But that didn’t stop him from sending another message. This time, it was graphic photos.

“Then he sent me pictures of his genitals. Both the front and the back,” Bella said.

According to a 2017 Pew Research study, more than half of women ages 18 to 29 say someone has sent them an explicit photo they did not ask for.

“I went on my Facebook and reached out to all my friends and said what can I do about this? And men and women all said there’s nothing you can do. All you can do is just take it,” Bella said.

Bella wasn’t convinced so she didn’t stop there.

“I called the police and I asked them what I can do and they said, ‘Oh there’s absolutely action you can take and we’ll send officers to your house right now,'” Bella said.

“This story is a great opportunity to let people know there is something you can do,” said Sgt. Ann Justus of the Phoenix Police Department.

The Phoenix Police Department said that Bella did the right thing. Police are on high alert when it comes to online sexual harassment with so many relying on the web for work and school.

“Call your local police department and if we’re not the right jurisdiction we will help you find that person,” Sgt. Justus said.

Now, after Bella filed an official report, she says she wants to press charges if given the chance. 

She hopes her story empowers others to come forward if they ever feel violated online.

“I just want to get this information out there because I want it to stop,” Bella said.

Texas has gone a step further and enacted a cyber flashing law. Women around the country are calling on other states to do the same.

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