Privacy Advocates Divided Over California’s Confusing and Complicated Prop. 24

Cristopher Centers

Share This Article: Photo via Pixabay Laurel Rosenhall | CalMatters It’s one of the most confounding fights on California’s November ballot: While tech companies lie low, advocates for consumer privacy are fighting among themselves over a measure that would give people new rights to control how companies use their digital […]

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Laurel Rosenhall | CalMatters

It’s one of the most confounding fights on California’s November ballot: While tech companies lie low, advocates for consumer privacy are fighting among themselves over a measure that would give people new rights to control how companies use their digital data.

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On one side are those who say Proposition 24 would make California’s existing privacy law even stronger, setting it up as a national model for consumer protection in the digital age. On the other, fellow privacy advocates say the initiative doubles down on problems in the current law and goes too easy on the businesses it’s supposed to regulate.

Credible consumer and privacy advocates have lined up on both sides of the issue, and one of the nation’s foremost privacy champions — the Electronic Frontier Foundation — has decided not to take a position, saying Prop. 24 amounts to “a mixed bag of partial steps backwards and forwards.”

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