Shine the light: October is national domestic violence awareness month | The Calhoun Times

In 2019, a domestic violence case in Gordon County had fatal results. Last September, Krystal Jones was shot and killed in a deadly domestic violence dispute. Her estranged husband, Dwight Juliuse Jones, was charged with the murder, two counts of aggravated assault against law enforcement, criminal damage to property, disorderly […]

In 2019, a domestic violence case in Gordon County had fatal results.

Last September, Krystal Jones was shot and killed in a deadly domestic violence dispute. Her estranged husband, Dwight Juliuse Jones, was charged with the murder, two counts of aggravated assault against law enforcement, criminal damage to property, disorderly conduct and violation of bond after an incident that included a brief shootout with police.

Three hours before the shooting that ended Krystal Jones’ life, she called police to report that Dwight Juliuse Jones had threatened her and showed police evidence of earlier domestic abuse.

As tragic as this murder was and is, murders and other acts of domestic violence are not unusual in our country or our state.

In 2019, there were 166 domestic violence-related deaths in Georgia, according to the Georgia Commission on Family Violence. There were 1,380 such deaths from 2010 to 2019. In 37 percent of the cases studied by Georgia’s Domestic Violence Fatality Review Project, children witnessed the domestic violence homicide.

Nationally, one in five women and one in seven men have experienced severe physical violence by an intimate partner at some point in their lifetime. This abuse can include physical violence, sexual violence, threats and emotional abuse and is defined as “the willful intimidation, physical assault, battery, sexual assault, and/or other abusive behavior as part of a systematic pattern of power and control perpetrated by one intimate partner against another” by the National Coalition Against Domestic Violence.

The state commission on family violence offers these statistics about domestic violence in Georgia:

♦ In 2018, law enforcement agencies reported response to 44,9000 family violence incidents in Georgia.

♦ In 2018, there were 26,672 protective and stalking orders issued in Georgia.

♦ In fiscal year 2019, there were 66,151 crisis calls to Georgia’s certified domestic violence agencies.

♦ I♦ n fiscal year 2019, 5,024 victims and children were provided 74,633 nights of refuge in Georgia domestic violence shelters.

♦ In fiscal year 2019, 7,530 victims made a request for shelter but their request was not met due to lack of space.

♦ Firearms were the cause of death in 73% of recorded domestic violence fatalities in 2019.

♦ 49% of victims in cases studied by Georgia’s Domestic Violence Fatali♦ ty Review Project began their relationship with the person who eventually killed them when they were between the ages of 13-24.

♦ Georgia ranked 10th in the nation in 2019 for the rate at which women are killed by men.

This year, COVID-19 has increased the risk of incidents of domestic violence.

During an April news conference about the pandemic, Governor Brian Kemp said Atlanta-area hospitals were already seeing a 15 percent increase in domestic violence cases in their facilities.

Deborah J. Vagins, president and CEO of the National Network to End Domestic Violence, told Medical News Today that abusers are likely to capitalize on the stress caused by the pandemic to exert control over survivors.

“Someone who has not been abusive does not suddenly become violent and controlling because they have lost a job or are under stay-at-home orders. However, abusers do take advantage of stressful situations, such as the COVID-19 pandemic, to gain more control and to keep survivors from accessing resources and support,” Vagins said.

The Gordon County Domestic Violence Outreach Center (DVOC) is doing its part locally to help protect women and men who are abused from their abusers during this difficult and potentially dangerous time.

Lane, a legal advocate with the DVOC, said domestic violence is not a private matter that should be hidden, ignored or excused. Instead, Lane said victims have a right to seek safety without guilt or fear.

Services offered from the Gordon County Domestic Violence Outreach Office include legal advocacy, individual support, support group, family violence assessments, referral services, safety planning and case management. For more information on the events or how to get involved, call their office at 706-625-5586 or for emergencies, call the 24-hour hotline 1-800-33-HAVEN.

Next Post

Veego Software is a Finalist Two Times Over for AI Technology

Israel-based startup perfects the internet experience. New York, NY, October 08, 2020 –(PR.com)– Veego Software, an Israel-based startup that perfects the internet experience in the connected home through the application of AI and other innovative technologies, today announced that it has been named by Computing as an award finalist for […]