Virtual event celebrates Latinx Heritage Month through poetry

Peláez said the poetry book includes various multimedia elements, and discusses national identity and its effects on a person’s own individual identity.  “This conversation will explore the printed book as the site of a re-enchantment with both language and the world, emphasizing how poetry might contribute towards building a counter-narrative […]

Peláez said the poetry book includes various multimedia elements, and discusses national identity and its effects on a person’s own individual identity. 

“This conversation will explore the printed book as the site of a re-enchantment with both language and the world, emphasizing how poetry might contribute towards building a counter-narrative to the capitalistic frameworks of belonging and national identity,” Peláez said. “Together they ask: why read books of poetry in the age of corona?”

Peláez said the book uses both words and images to explore the modern United States. 

“Bound by a commitment to the printed word and the transformative power of language, these books explore contemporary American Landscapes, probing the relationship between history, vision, lyric poetry and photography,” Peláez said. 

Both collections explore the interconnection between immigration and identity. Peláez said they identify themselves as a migrant first and a student second. 

The event is being held during Latinx Heritage Month, which takes place from Sept. 15 to Oct. 15 and serves as a month to recognize the achievements and impact that those of Latinx descent have had on the U.S. 

Professor Geovani Ramírez, who teaches English and Comparative Literature at UNC and helped to organize the event, said in an email that he hopes it will bring Latinx Heritage Month to the greater UNC community. 

“It is a great way to help celebrate Latinx Heritage(s) Month,” Ramírez said in the email. “I can say that from my conversations with emilio that they are the essence of poetry, and it is a privilege to listen to them talk about literature and life.”

@chloe08w

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